Introducing Writing for the Little Hands

Introducing Writing for the Little Hands

Children take quite some time to develop the necessary fine motor skills to write with a pencil, but there are alternative fun activities that can be done to introduce writing without killing the fun in writing for our little ones. I will be sharing some of the activities that I have done with my elder boy throughout these 1.5 years that helped him build writing skills here.

At 27 months my boy wasn’t ready to grip a pencil to do writing yet. Still, we decided to introduce drawing of shapes and writing of letters of the alphabet and numbers through other means. As my boy loved sticker activities, we got him to paste stickers onto the printable sheets just like the way we would write the alphabet.         

Pic 1 Pic 2

These are the links which I got my printable sheets from:  

1)http://www.confessionsofahomeschooler.com/blog/2012/12/a-z-do-a-dot-worksheets.html

2)http://www.dltk-teach.com/alphabuddies/daubers/

3)http://www.confessionsofahomeschooler.com/blog/2013/05/free-1-20-do-a-dot-number-worksheets.html

Other than stickers, we would get him to ‘write’ the letters or ‘draw’ the shapes with things other than stickers. Here is where we can get creative! The list is non-exhaustive and some examples of stuff that I have used with my boy are:

1. Pompoms

Pic 3

2. Dinosaurs (when we did letter D)

Pic 4

3. Magnets

Pic 5

4. Toy cars (when we did letter C)

Pic 6

5. Push pins (he only had strength to do this when he was nearing 3 years old)

Pic 7

6. Thumb printing (we tried this to introduce Chinese strokes in his name at 3 years old)

Pic 8

7. MALA markers from IKEA (he started this at about 3.5 years old)

Pic 9 Pic 10

At 3 years onwards, after my boy have some concept of how the letters and numbers were written; I got him to trace them using his toy cars on these printables like how they were written

Pic 11

Links for the printables can be found at:

1)http://www.makinglearningfun.com/themepages/RacecarHighwayNumbers.htm  2)http://www.makinglearningfun.com/themepages/RacecarABCcards.htm

I also used the following method to help my boy see how certain numbers and letters were written using Jenga blocks as shown in the image and video below.  Using the example of letter C in the video, I would first line the blocks in the way I would write the letter. Next, I would get my boy to topple the blocks to show him the way how letter C is written with the domino effect.

Pic 12

At about 3 years and 4 months, I wanted to level him up a bit. As his tiny hands are not developed for a pencil grip yet we used another method to help him learn writing. Using a magnetic drawing board and a big button magnet, I got him to write his numbers and letters as shown in the following video.

As my boy progressed and became better at writing, I started to get him to trace the letters and numbers using a Q-tip and some paint. The numbers and letters are pre-written by me in a large sketch book before he traces them.

Pic 13

Now that my boy is approaching 4 soon, he is better with the pencil grip. He is able to hold fat markers and fat pencils designed for children’s use to trace dotted numbers and letters. Here is an example of him writing his letter B using laminated strips with his Crayola washable markers.  He is also using Faber Castel’s triangular pencils to write his numbers.

Pic 14

Links for the writing strips:                                                           

1)http://thelettersofliteracy.com/gingerbread-letter-tracing-strips/ 

After using the dotted versions as a guide, I would get him to try and write on the white board without any help to see if he is able to write the letter or number.

Pic 15

That’s our writing journey so far with my elder boy. There are some more alternative writing activities I intend to try with him which I will share if there is a chance next time. Hope these ideas helps!

Content Source: Mummy Fiona
Edited By: Preschool Resources
The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of Preschool Resources.

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *